What the Kohli-Kumble saga tells us : Captains are best off being advised by senior team-mates on the field, and assisted by managers off it – Ian Chappell

Pakistan soundly beat India in the Champions Trophy final, and it has been interesting, to say the least, to witness the aftermath.

Firstly, the Indian coach, Anil Kumble, resigned. Then the Pakistan players – not surprisingly – were welcomed home as heroes. This was followed by an ICC announcement that Afghanistan and Ireland have been added to the list of Test-playing nations, increasing the number to 12.

Kumble’s resignation was no great surprise, as he’s a strong-minded individual and the deteriorating relationship between him and the captain, Virat Kohli, had reached the stage of being a distraction. Kumble’s character is relevant to any discussion about India’s future coaching appointments. The captain is the only person who can run an international cricket team properly, because so much of the job involves on-field decision making. Also, a good part of the leadership role – performed off the field – has to be handled by the captain, as it helps him earn the players’ respect, which is crucial to his success.

Consequently a captain has to be a strong-minded individual and decisive in his thought process. To put someone of a similar mindset in a position where he’s advising the captain is inviting confrontation.

The captain’s best advisors are his vice-captain, a clear-thinking wicketkeeper, and one or two senior players. They are out on the field and can best judge the mood of the game and what advice should be offered to the captain and when.

The best off-field assistance for a captain will come from a good managerial type. Someone who can attend to duties that are not necessarily related to winning or losing cricket matches, but done efficiently, can contribute to the success of the team.

The last thing a captain needs is to come off the field and have someone second-guess his decisions. He also doesn’t need a strong-minded individual (outside his advisory group) getting too involved in the pre-match tactical planning. Too often I see captaincy that appears to be the result of the previous evening’s planning, and despite ample evidence that it’s hindering the team’s chances of victory, it remains the plan throughout the day.

Too often I see captaincy that appears to be the result of the previous evening’s planning, and despite ample evidence that it’s hindering the team’s chances of victory, it remains the plan throughout the day

This is generally a sure sign that the captain is following someone else’s plan and that he, the captain, is the wrong man for the job.

India is fortunate to have two capable leaders in Kohli and the man who stood in for him during the Test series with Australia, Ajinkya Rahane.

It’s Kohli’s job as captain to concentrate on things that help win or lose cricket matches, and his off-field assistants’ task is to ensure he is not distracted in trying to achieve victory.

India’s opponents in the final, Pakistan, were unusually free of any controversies during the tournament. They were capably led by Sarfraz Ahmed, who appeared to become more and more his own man as the tournament progressed.

Watching Pakistan’s success unfold from Islamabad, it was obvious how much the team’s success meant to the fans. While the ICC deliberated on increasing the number of Test-playing nations, it’s good to see some consideration was given to Pakistan’s plight; they have not played matches at home for close to a decade now.

It was the right time for the ICC to implement a plan to resume matches in Pakistan and to commence with small steps. In light of the recent instability around the world, it was reasonable to ask: “Is Pakistan the only region that is unsafe for hosting cricket matches?” On the evidence I saw, and from what I was told by people in a position to know the situation, Pakistan’s security is much improved from the recent past.

Adding Afghanistan – incidentally, a more dangerous country than Pakistan – and Ireland to the roster does seem a little premature. The last thing thing Test cricket needs is more uncompetitive matches. Surely the priority is to ensure Pakistan and West Indies, two great contributors to the rich history of the game, are both playing Test cricket to their full potential before expanding the number of teams.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is a cricket commentator for Channel Nine, and a columnist – Article Courtesy – espncricinfo.com

Couple of records for Mithali Raj as the captain of Indian Women team

No Player Team Span Mat Inns NO Runs HS Ave C HC 50+ 0
1 CM Edwards Eng 2005-2016 117 107 16 3523 138 38.71 5 28 33 9
2 M Raj Ind 2004-2017 101 87 30 3366 108* 59.05 3 30 33 1
3 BJ Clark Aus 1994-2005 101 97 9 4150 229* 47.15 5 24 29 3

 

Mithali Raj of India scored 71 against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17. This knock fetched her following records as captain in the history of Women one day internationals

 

It was his 33rd fifty as captain and she shares the record with CM Edwards of England for most fifties by a captain in the history of Women one day internationals. CM Edwards has also scored 33 fifties

 

It was his 30th half century and she owns the record for most half centuries by a captain in the annals of Women one day internationals

 

She has played 101 one day internationals leading India. She shares the second place with BJ Clark of Australia who has led her team in 101 games. CM Edwards of England holds the record with 117 appearances as captain in Women one day internationals. CM Edwards, Mithali Raj and BJ Clark are the only three women cricketers to have led their  teams in 100 plus  one day internationals.

Mithali Raj owns the record for most half centuries in the history of Women One day Internationals

 

Mithali Raj scored 71 against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17 to post her 47th half century in one day games. She now owns the record for most half centuries in the history of women one  day internationals. She went past CM Edwards of England who held the record  previously with 46 half centuries to her credit

 

CM Edwards and Mithali Raj are the only two women batsmen in the history of women one day international to score fifty fifties. CM Edwars has socred 55 fifties {09 C plus 46 HC}, while Mithali Raj has scored 52 fifties {05 C plus 47 HC}

Mithali Raj of India wrote herself into record books as the first women batsman to score seven fifties in a row in the annals of Women One day Internationals.

Mithali Dorai Raj

Mithali Raj of India wrote herself into record books as the first women batsman to score seven fifties in a row in the annals of Women One day Internationals. She scored 71 against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17 to post  her seventh consecutive fifty. Her seven fifties in a row are tabulated below

No Opposition Runs Inns Ground Start Date
1 SL Women 70* 1 Colombo (PSS) 07 Feb 2017
2 SA Women 64 1 Colombo (PSS) 15 Feb 2017
3 Bdesh Wmn 73* 2 Colombo (NCC) 17 Feb 2017
4 SA Women 51* 2 Potchefstroom (Uni) 09 May 2017
5 SA Women 54 2 Potchefstroom 17 May 2017
6 SA Women 62* 2 Potchefstroom 21 May 2017
7 ENG Women 71 1 Derby 24 Jun 2017

First three batswomen scoring fifties in a one day internationals

Indian women   – PG Raut {86}, S Mandhana {90} and Mithali Raj {71} –  scored fifties while batting at positions one, two and three in the game against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17 to provide the eleventh occasion of first three batswomen scoring fifties in a one day game in the annals of Women one day games. All such occasions are tabulated below

No Team Inns Oppositon Ground Start Date C HC 50+
1 New Zealand 1 Netherlands Sydney 04 Dec 1988 1 2 3
2 Australia 1 Pakistan Melbourne 07 Feb 1997 2 1 3
3 England 1 Denmark Hyderabad 14 Dec 1997 0 3 3
4 Australia 1 Denmark Mumbai 16 Dec 1997 1 2 3
5 Australia 1 England Newcastle 03 Feb 2000 1 2 3
6 India 1 West Indies Dhanbad 26 Feb 2004 0 3 3
7 Australia 2 New Zealand Lincoln 16 Mar 2008 0 3 3
8 Australia 1 New Zealand Hamilton 08 Feb 2009 0 3 3
9 England 1 West Indies Sydney 17 Mar 2009 0 3 3
10 South Africa 1 Bangladesh Cox’s Bazar 12 Jan 2017 0 3 3
11 India 1 England Derby 24 Jun 2017 0 3 3

Indian women   – PG Raut {86}, S Mandhana {90} and M Raj {71} –  scored fifties while batting at positions one, two and three in the game against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17 to provide the second occasion of first three Indian batswomen scoring fifties in a one day game in the annals of Women one day games. Both the occasions are tabulated below

No Team Inns Oppositon Ground Start Date C HC 50+
1 India 1 West Indies Dhanbad 26 Feb 2004 0 3 3
2 India 1 England Derby 24 Jun 2017 0 3 3

Indian women   – PG Raut {86}, S Mandhana {90} and M Raj {71} –  scored fifties while batting at positions one, two and three in the game against England at Derby on 24 Jun 17 to provide the second occasion of first three batswomen scoring fifties in a one day game against England in the annals of Women one day games. All such occasions are tabulated below

No Team Inns Oppositon Ground Start Date C HC 50+
1 Australia 1 England Newcastle 03 Feb 2000 1 2 3
2 India 1 England Derby 24 Jun 2017 0 3 3

Australia women own the record in this category of statistics having achieved the feat on five occasions. All such occasions are listed below

No Team Inns Oppositon Ground Start Date C HC 50+
1 Australia 1 Pakistan Melbourne 07 Feb 1997 2 1 3
2 Australia 1 Denmark Mumbai 16 Dec 1997 1 2 3
3 Australia 1 England Newcastle 03 Feb 2000 1 2 3
4 Australia 2 New Zealand Lincoln 16 Mar 2008 0 3 3
5 Australia 1 New Zealand Hamilton 08 Feb 2009 0 3 3

Womens’ World Cup has witnessed five such occasions. All the five occasions are tabulated below. England has accomplished such a feat on two occasions. New Zealand, Australia and India have achieved such a feat once.

No Team Inns Oppositon Ground Start Date C HC 50+
1 New Zealand 1 Netherlands Sydney 04 Dec 1988 1 2 3
2 England 1 Denmark Hyderabad 14 Dec 1997 0 3 3
3 Australia 1 Denmark Mumbai 16 Dec 1997 1 2 3
4 England 1 West Indies Sydney 17 Mar 2009 0 3 3
5 India 1 England Derby 24 Jun 2017 0 3

3

 

ICC okays new cricket rules, players can be sent off for violence from October 1, 2017

The Cricket Committee’s proposals for rule changes include giving umpires the power to send off players for the most serious incidents of player misconduct, including violence. All members agreed to implement this in full. All other offences would continue to be dealt with under the ICC Code of Conduct.

From October 1, umpires will now be vested with the power to send players off the field for serious incidents of misconduct.

The International Cricket Council has decided that teams will no longer lose a review under the Decision Review System (DRS) if a leg before referral returns as ‘Umpires Call’, part of a slew of changes recommended by its Cricket Committee.

The ICC Chief Executives Committee approved the recommendations made by the panel headed by India’s Anil Kumble at its annual conference held in London this week.

The decisions include the use of DRS in all T20 Internationals. With the tweak in the DRS rule on umpires call, the current rule allowing the top-up of reviews after 80 overs in Tests has been removed.

The minimum standards for DRS use would include the mandatory use of accredited ball tracking and edge detection technology.

The Cricket Committee’s proposals for rule changes include giving umpires the power to send off players for the most serious incidents of player misconduct, including violence. All members agreed to implement this in full. All other offences would continue to be dealt with under the ICC Code of Conduct.

Other major changes to the laws are restriction on bat dimensions (thickness of edges and depth of bat), and that a batsman will have made his or her ground when a bat bounces after being grounded behind the crease by a running or diving batsman. Currently the batsman will be ruled out if the bat is not grounded when the stumps are disturbed.

The new playing conditions will come into effect from October 1.

Article Courtesy – The Hindustan Times

If Virat Kohli feels he’s the boss, India doesn’t need a coach: Former off-spinner EAS Prasanna

The former off-spinner also said that he wasn’t sure if Kohli was a good captain

Former India off-spinner Erapalli Prasanna today took a dig at Virat Kohli and said if the current skipper feels he is the “boss” of the Indian cricket then the team can do without a coach.

Prasanna sounded cynical in his response when asked about the rift between Kohli and Anil Kumble, who quit as Indian cricket team coach recently.

“Why do they require a coach, if the captain is the boss? I don’t think they even need the services of batting or fielding coaches (Sanjay Bangar and R Sridhar),” the former spin great told PTI.

Prasanna also questioned Kohli’s captaincy abilities.

“Kohli is undoubtedly a very good player but I do not know whether he is a good captain or not,” he said.

Kumble quit as India coach in the aftermath of their Champions Trophy final loss to arch-rivals Pakistan, stating that Kohli had reservations about his coaching “style” and their partnership was “untenable”.

The Indian team will be without a coach in the tour to the West Indies, where they play five ODIs and one-off T20 match starting at Port of Spain later today.

“If a legendary cricketer like Anil Kumble is not respected, I do not think neither of them — Bangar and Sridhar — will have the guts to speak to Kohli in a confident way. None of them are as experienced like Kumble,” Prasanna said.

“Just hire somebody for the physical training and that will be enough. If such is the attitude of a captain I don’t think you require a coach,” the 77-year-old said, seemingly upset with Kohli’s behaviour.

“We can go back to the good old days of appointing a manager to look after the logistics, if he (Kohli) takes up the responsibility. The role of a coach is not defined,” he added.

The Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) consisting former cricketers Sachin Tendulkar, Sourav Ganguly and VVS Laxman has been entrusted with the responsibility of recommending the coach to the BCCI but Prasanna said the appointment system needs an overhaul.

Prasanna further said the time has come for India to look beyond old warhorses like Yuvraj Singh and Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

“I don’t think they will be able to continue till the next World Cup in 2019, they will be 38 then. We need fresh and young legs and players who are extremely agile,” he said.

“Okay, Dhoni will be the wicketkeeper but Yuvraj is going to be a liability as a fielder. In fact, the selectors should have tried out more youngsters for this West Indies tour, as they are one of the weakest teams at the moment.”

Article courtesy – Daily News and Analysis

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